On behalf of Lexham Press and Faithlife, thank you for your interest in Didaktikos. The idea behind the journal is to support all of us engaged in teaching the Bible and theology—and to encourage us to "teach well" (2 Tim 2:24).

Didaktikos is a peer-reviewed, professor-to-professor journal that covers important advances in theological education in a user-friendly format. Published four times a year, the full-color print edition is mailed free to every professor teaching in biblical, theological, and related disciplines in the US and Canada. A digital edition is available to professors in other countries. This is an unprecedented opportunity to encourage our colleagues around the world!

Submissions to Didaktikos should reflect both strong scholarship and strong communication. While many essays are commissioned by the editor, Didaktikos welcomes unsolicited abstracts from faculty members. If you are a faculty member at a college or graduate school and would like to have your ideas considered by Didaktikos, please choose "submit an essay proposal" below.

Thanks for your interest in writing for Didaktikos: Journal of Theological Education.

In many ways, Didaktikos is a hybrid between an academic journal and a trade magazine. We have a unique peer-reviewed model coupled with full-color images and engaging essays intended to inform and encourage theological faculty.

To submit an essay proposal, use the form at the bottom of this page. As you craft your proposal, please keep in mind the following points about the journal's audience, priorities, and format.

Audience

Our readers include professors, instructors, and faculty of Bible, theology, and related disciplines. (Do not write for pastors or students.) Didaktikos is distributed free to a diverse body of professional educators with a wide range of theological and related ideological commitments.

Priorities

Didaktikos aims to help theological faculty “teach well.” The best essays we receive are informative, thoughtful, encouraging, and full of concrete examples that faculty can apply in their classrooms and lives. A successful proposal will reflect these priorities.

Format

Unlike many academic journals, Didaktikos is organized into columns, each of which has a specific goal. Most of our essays are short by academic standards (800–1500 words, depending on the column). Your essay proposal should align with one of the following columns:

  • Currents (800–1000 words, including notes) – The goal of a Currents essay is to expose faculty to one recent, critical insight that has developed in a specific field of study (e.g., Theology, New Testament, Old Testament, Archaeology, Church History, etc.). However, the writer should assume that readers do NOT belong to the chosen field. The writer should ask: “What is something I wish my colleagues in other fields understood about my field?” The ideal contributor is a scholar engaged in significant, ongoing research projects.
  • I, Professor (500–600 words, including notes) – In each issue of Didaktikos, this essay serves as an intro to the journal. The goal is to reflect on how a professor’s personal ministry can speak wisdom into their calling and help them “teach well.” The ideal contributor is a well-established professor.
  • Lights On (500–600 words, including notes) – The goal of a Lights On essay is to resource faculty in ethics and good practices. The writer should share one example/suggestion/issue that can speak into professors' lives and help them continue to “teach well.” The ideal contributor has worked or published in the area of Christian ethics.
  • Faculty Lounge (500–600 words, including notes) – The goal of a Faculty Lounge essay is to give one example/suggestion for career development or discuss how faculty can thrive in the academic workplace. The ideal contributor serves as a dean, provost, or president.
  • Pedagogy (1000–1500 words, including notes) – The goal of a Pedagogy essay is to give one or two concrete examples of how professors can “teach well" in a traditional classroom setting.
  • Online Pedagogy (1000–1500 words, including notes) – The goal of an Online Pedagogy essay is to give one or two concrete examples of how professors can “teach well” while instructing online students in a virtual environment.
  • Historical Pedagogy (1000–1500 words, including notes) – The goal of a Historical Pedagogy essay is to give one or two concrete examples of how teaching occurred in the ancient world and how that technique could inform pedagogy today.
  • Research & Development (500–600 words, including notes) – The goal of a Research & Development essay is to provide a practical example/suggestion/idea about being successful in publishing while maintaining an ethos of “teaching well.” The ideal contributor is a prolific scholar or someone who works in publishing.
  • Adventures in Adjuncting (500–1000 words, including notes) – The goal of an Adventures in Adjuncting essay is to provide an outlook on the ups and downs of being an adjunct professor while striving to “teach well.” Practical examples of excellence while adjuncting are preferred. The contributor must be an adjunct professor.
  • Around the World (1000–1200 words, including notes) – The goal of an Around the World essay is to expose North American faculty to the unique challenges of “teaching well” in a non-North American context. Clear stories of the unique challenges of this context are preferred. The contributor must serve in a non-North American context.
Didaktikos: Journal of Theological Education